Wearable anti-fatigue brainwave detector may saves lives

Impecca The Alert Band Photo with man
A new wearable gadget that attaches to a driver’s forehead promises to send real-time alerts to an iPhone or Android device three to five minutes before the driver falls asleep. It’s called The Alert Band by Impecca and it’s being introduced at International CES 2015. The device which the company says is 90% accurate, is designed to sense fatigue and help prevent accidents.
The idea for The Alert Band came about after a friend of the developer was severely injured in a car accident because someone had hit him after they had fallen asleep behind the wheel. Read more…at CanoeTech Blog

Survival Sidekick might just save your life

 RCEP100FL_ALT3_MEDToday, in a suburb just outside Minneapolis, Bob Renning, a Good Samaritan, somehow found the strength to pry open the door of Michael Johannes’ burning Chevrolet TrailBlazer and saved him from certain death.  Now after seeing the footage at Canoe cNews, it made me rethink the usefulness of features on today’s emergency gadgets that we think we’ll never use, but in actual fact could one day save our life.

One such feature is the glass breaker found on the new Champ Survival Sidekick 8-in-1 (Emergency Preparedness) Multitool by Voxx Accessories. Johannes had mentioned that he was unable to get out of his vehicle as the electrical system was disabled and he couldn’t unlock the door. And without his good fortune that someone like Renning just happened to be around, he may not be alive right now to tell about it.

The Survival Sidekick 8-in-1 actually looks like a very large flashlight, and a flashlight it is. It features three LEDs that can keep shining brightly for up to five consecutive hours.      Read more…AT CANOE TECH BLOG

Go-Taxi app allows you to quickly, safely and easily catch a cab

The Go Taxi app was developed by Edmonton, AB-based Tim TuxworthThe Edmonton, Alberta Go-Taxi app is currently available inHong Kong, Jersey Shore, Chicago, Tampa Bay, Florida and North Carolina

EDMONTON, AB, Sep 30, 2013/ Troy Media/ – When two Boston women, in two separate incidents, each hailed what they thought was a cab, the last thing they expected to happen was to be assaulted by the drivers. While reports so far indicate police are saying these incidents of “fake” cabs are unrelated, it begs the question: how safe is it to hail a cab?

The best way to ensure safety is to use a licensed cab company. While regulations vary by municipality, the cab, or taxi industry is generally highly regulated, and drivers are vetted, including criminal record checks, licensed, bonded and required to adhere to codes of conduct.

Even so, you need to ensure the actual cab is legit. In Boston for example, all licensed cabs, historically called Hackney Carriages, are approved by the Police Commissioner and have its identification medallion on the rear trunk. There are also other identifying decals specifically placed on the rear passenger door window and on the Plexiglas partition between driver and customer. The driver will also have his Hackney license displayed.  READ MORE AT TROY MEDIA